Today's Reading

"My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me."
—JANE AUSTEN
________

HOPE DIAMOND COMING HERE

THE FAMOUS BLUE STONE BOUGHT BY A NEW YORKER
PRICE SAID TO BE $250,000


LONDON, Nov. 13—The report that the famous Hope blue diamond is going to New York is correct. It is in the possession of a member of a New York firm now on his way to America from London. The heirloom was sold by order of the Master in Chancery.

It was said that the price paid for the diamond was $250,000.

If the Hope diamond has been sold for $250,000, as reported, it has proved even more valuable than has hitherto been supposed, as the outside estimate placed on it was $25,000. The gem belonged to Lord Francis Pelham Clinton Hope, who was only allowed to sell it after a long legal fight.

It was not the size of the stone which gives it its value, but the fact that it is the only very large blue diamond known. It weighs 44 1/4 karats, while the next largest blue diamond, the Brunswick stone, weighs only 10 3/4 karats.

In 1688 Tavernier, the famous French traveler, returned to Paris, bearing twenty-five diamonds, which were all purchased by Louis XIV. A great blue diamond, weighing 112 1/2 karats, was the chief of these gems. The process of cutting reduced its weight to 67 1/8 karats. At the time of the French Revolution the diamond disappeared, but in 1830 the diamond now known as the Hope stone appeared in the possession of a certain Daniel Ellison. He sold it for £13,000 to Henry Thomas Hope, the London banker.

It is now regarded as certain that the Hope stone and the Brunswick gem were once a single diamond, and that this diamond was the long lost Tavernier stone.
________

PARIS JEWELER TO OPEN HERE

Intends to Bring French Workmen and Fill Orders Locally.

By Marconi Transatlantic Wireless Telegraph to The New York Times

Paris, April 3—(By telegraph to Clifden, Ireland; thence by wireless.)—The Rue de la Paix is being moved to Fifth Avenue. Louis Cartier, the well-known jeweler in the Rue de la Paix, is to open a branch establishment in Fifth Avenue next Fall. I learned this week that he will not only have a shop there, but that he intends taking over several French workmen, so that all his work done for America will be done in America. It will not be necessary to send anything from Paris after the first outlay, which will involve several hundred thousand dollars. Pierre Cartier, one of his sons, is to have charge of the New York shop, together with Jules Glaenzer, an American, who has been with the firm for some time.

Many of the most famous pieces of jewelry in the possession of the crowned heads of Europe, leaders of the American smart set, and celebrated actresses came from Cartier's. The enamel work of the firm is especially fine.

________

CHAPTER 1

New York City
February 3, 1911


Diamonds, scientists say, are the world's hardest material. And yet, like a heart, a diamond can break. When I was a reporter covering a story about the Hope Diamond, my research taught me that often a gem cutter will study a major stone for months, deciding where to strike, as cleaving is a precise and risky effort. If the jeweler misjudges, he can destroy the stone.

As a woman, I've learned the same thing. A single mistake can destroy a relationship.

Standing here in the cold, staring at the fountain in front of the Plaza Hotel, I try to pretend that I'm not really crying. That what look like tears are simply snowflakes melting on my cheeks.

But that's just another lie. And I promised myself that I was done with lies. Untruths, whether by omission or commission, are how I got here—a place I never wanted to be and from which I am trying to escape.

For weeks and weeks, my sadness has felt oddly comforting. A proof of love. A reminder that even if I have lost that love, I did have it once. And now the time has come to fight for it. But am I willing to risk what is left of my pride? Willing to risk another failure even if there's little—if any—chance of winning that love back?

My father once said, The fight is all. But so far, this fight has laid me bare, stripped me of all pretense, and broken my heart.
...

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Today's Reading

"My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me."
—JANE AUSTEN
________

HOPE DIAMOND COMING HERE

THE FAMOUS BLUE STONE BOUGHT BY A NEW YORKER
PRICE SAID TO BE $250,000


LONDON, Nov. 13—The report that the famous Hope blue diamond is going to New York is correct. It is in the possession of a member of a New York firm now on his way to America from London. The heirloom was sold by order of the Master in Chancery.

It was said that the price paid for the diamond was $250,000.

If the Hope diamond has been sold for $250,000, as reported, it has proved even more valuable than has hitherto been supposed, as the outside estimate placed on it was $25,000. The gem belonged to Lord Francis Pelham Clinton Hope, who was only allowed to sell it after a long legal fight.

It was not the size of the stone which gives it its value, but the fact that it is the only very large blue diamond known. It weighs 44 1/4 karats, while the next largest blue diamond, the Brunswick stone, weighs only 10 3/4 karats.

In 1688 Tavernier, the famous French traveler, returned to Paris, bearing twenty-five diamonds, which were all purchased by Louis XIV. A great blue diamond, weighing 112 1/2 karats, was the chief of these gems. The process of cutting reduced its weight to 67 1/8 karats. At the time of the French Revolution the diamond disappeared, but in 1830 the diamond now known as the Hope stone appeared in the possession of a certain Daniel Ellison. He sold it for £13,000 to Henry Thomas Hope, the London banker.

It is now regarded as certain that the Hope stone and the Brunswick gem were once a single diamond, and that this diamond was the long lost Tavernier stone.
________

PARIS JEWELER TO OPEN HERE

Intends to Bring French Workmen and Fill Orders Locally.

By Marconi Transatlantic Wireless Telegraph to The New York Times

Paris, April 3—(By telegraph to Clifden, Ireland; thence by wireless.)—The Rue de la Paix is being moved to Fifth Avenue. Louis Cartier, the well-known jeweler in the Rue de la Paix, is to open a branch establishment in Fifth Avenue next Fall. I learned this week that he will not only have a shop there, but that he intends taking over several French workmen, so that all his work done for America will be done in America. It will not be necessary to send anything from Paris after the first outlay, which will involve several hundred thousand dollars. Pierre Cartier, one of his sons, is to have charge of the New York shop, together with Jules Glaenzer, an American, who has been with the firm for some time.

Many of the most famous pieces of jewelry in the possession of the crowned heads of Europe, leaders of the American smart set, and celebrated actresses came from Cartier's. The enamel work of the firm is especially fine.

________

CHAPTER 1

New York City
February 3, 1911


Diamonds, scientists say, are the world's hardest material. And yet, like a heart, a diamond can break. When I was a reporter covering a story about the Hope Diamond, my research taught me that often a gem cutter will study a major stone for months, deciding where to strike, as cleaving is a precise and risky effort. If the jeweler misjudges, he can destroy the stone.

As a woman, I've learned the same thing. A single mistake can destroy a relationship.

Standing here in the cold, staring at the fountain in front of the Plaza Hotel, I try to pretend that I'm not really crying. That what look like tears are simply snowflakes melting on my cheeks.

But that's just another lie. And I promised myself that I was done with lies. Untruths, whether by omission or commission, are how I got here—a place I never wanted to be and from which I am trying to escape.

For weeks and weeks, my sadness has felt oddly comforting. A proof of love. A reminder that even if I have lost that love, I did have it once. And now the time has come to fight for it. But am I willing to risk what is left of my pride? Willing to risk another failure even if there's little—if any—chance of winning that love back?

My father once said, The fight is all. But so far, this fight has laid me bare, stripped me of all pretense, and broken my heart.
...

Join the Library's Online Book Clubs and start receiving chapters from popular books in your daily email. Every day, Monday through Friday, we'll send you a portion of a book that takes only five minutes to read. Each Monday we begin a new book and by Friday you will have the chance to read 2 or 3 chapters, enough to know if it's a book you want to finish. You can read a wide variety of books including fiction, nonfiction, romance, business, teen and mystery books. Just give us your email address and five minutes a day, and we'll give you an exciting world of reading.

What our readers think...